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Is there Uber in Tulum? BEST ways to get around Tulum 

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Heading to Tulum and wondering if you can catch an Uber to get around? So you’re wondering, Is there uber in Tulum? I hate to break it to you, but the short answer is no. Uber doesn’t currently operate in Tulum, Mexico.

But don’t panic! There are plenty of other convenient and affordable ways to navigate Tulum’s boho beach town. From bikes to scooters to good old-fashioned walking, I’ll give you the full scoop on how to get from point A to point B in Tulum—no Uber required.

So buckle up and get ready for the ride. Your comprehensive guide to Tulum transportation

Uber in Tulum: all you need to know for the best way to get around in Tulum

No time to read it all? Here are the highlights:

Is There Uber in Tulum?

There is no Uber Tulum. Taxis are the most popular way to get around in Tulum. Walking is doable in Tulum town, but the 2-mile trek to the beach is a sweaty endeavor. Stick to wheels for that trip.

Renting a bike or scooter is an affordable and fun way to get around Tulum town and the beach road. Many hotels offer free bikes for guests.

If you want to explore outside Tulum, renting a car is a great option, but dealing with traffic and parking can be a hassle. Consider day trips with a tour operator instead.

Theres also Ado Buses and Colectivos

Want more details and insider tips? Read on for everything you need to know about getting around in Tulum without Uber.

Coco Tran — Aesthetic Travel Blog By Film Photographer Coco Tran https://cocotran.com/uber-in-tulum-best-way-to-get-around-in-tulum/

Why Isn’t There Uber in Tulum?

Uber has made inroads in some parts of Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula, but Tulum isn’t one of them. The main reason is strong local opposition from Tulum’s taxi union.

Taxi drivers see Uber as a threat to their livelihood. While Uber has fought similar battles in Cancun, they’ve yet to attempt to establish a foothold in Tulum. For now, taxis reign supreme.

are there Uber/Lyft alternatives in tulum? Does LYFT work in Tulum?

While Uber and Lyft don’t operate in Tulum as of 2024, there are several alternatives for getting around the town and surrounding areas. Here are some Uber and Lyft alternatives in Tulum read on below!

Getting to Tulum: The Best way to get to tulum

So how do you get to Tulum from other areas and the Tulum airport? Best way to get to Tulum from Playa del Carmen or Cancun is a private transfer or a shared transfer.

How do you get to tulum Mexico from Cancun?

Getting to Tulum from Cancun Airport (CUN). Here’s how to get to Tulum from Cancun Airport, Playa del Carmen, and other nearby destinations:

RELATED: Best Cenotes in Tulum

how to get to tulum from cancun airport

Getting to Tulum from Cancun Airport (CUN) As the closest airport to Tulum, most travelers fly into Cancun International Airport (CUN). From there, you have several options for getting to Tulum, which is about 120 km (75 miles) south:

  1. 🚊 Private Shuttle: The most hassle-free option. Book a shuttle online and your driver will meet you at the airport and take you directly to your hotel in Tulum. Rates average $75-150 USD one-way and the ride takes about 1.5-2 hours.
  2. 🚗 Rental Car: If you plan to explore more of the Riviera Maya, you can rent a car at the Cancun Airport and drive to Tulum via Highway 307. The journey takes 1.5-2 hours, but dealing with logistics after a flight can be tiring.
  3. 🚕 Taxi: You can take a taxi from the airport straight to Tulum, but it’s expensive at $100-150 USD one-way. Rates are set at the taxi stands. It’s more economical to book a shuttle.
  4. 🚌 ADO Bus: The most budget-friendly way to get to Tulum. Catch the ADO bus at the airport terminal for around 300 pesos ($15 USD). It’s a direct 2-2.5 hour ride to Tulum’s bus station downtown.
Coco Tran — Aesthetic Travel Blog By Film Photographer Coco Tran https://cocotran.com/uber-in-tulum-best-way-to-get-around-in-tulum/
Exploring Coba Ruins in Mexico – The most Magical ruins in Tulum

how to get from playa del carmen to tulum?

Getting to Tulum from Playa del Carmen: Playa del Carmen is about 65 km (40 miles) north of Tulum. Here’s how to travel between the two:

  1. Private Transfer: A shared transfer from Playa del Carmen or Private Shuttle Transfer. The easiest and convenient way!
  2. 🚗 Rental Car: If you have a rental car, it’s an easy 1 hour drive from Playa del Carmen to Tulum via Highway 307. The route is well-marked and the road is in good condition.
  3. 🚐 Colectivo: These shared vans run frequently between Playa and Tulum. Catch one along the highway in either town. The ride takes about 1 hour and costs around 45-70 pesos ($2-4 USD) per person.
  4. 🚌 ADO Bus: ADO operates regular bus service from Playa del Carmen to Tulum. Catch the bus at the terminal on 5th Avenue and Benito Juarez. The ride takes about 1 hour and costs 70-100 pesos ($4-5 USD).
  5. 🚕 Taxi: You can take a taxi from Playa to Tulum, but it’s pricey at around 800-1000 pesos ($40-50 USD) one-way. Negotiate the fare before getting in.

RELATED: Best Things To Do in Tulum Ultimate Tulum Travel Guide

Tulum from other areas nearby Tulum?

  1. Private Transfer: A shared transfer from nearby Tulum towns or a Private Shuttle. The easiest and most convenient way!
  2. 🚗 Rental Car: If you have a rental car, it’s an easy 1 hour drive from Playa del Carmen to Tulum via Highway 307. The route is well-marked and the road is in good condition.
  3. 🚐 Colectivo: These shared vans run frequently between Playa and Tulum. Catch one along the highway in either town. The ride takes about 1 hour and costs around 45-70 pesos ($2-4 USD) per person.
  4. 🚌 ADO Bus: ADO operates regular bus service from Playa del Carmen to Tulum. Catch the bus at the terminal on 5th Avenue and Benito Juarez. The ride takes about 1 hour and costs 70-100 pesos ($4-5 USD).
  5. 🚕 Taxi: You can take a taxi from Playa to Tulum, but it’s pricey at around 800-1000 pesos ($40-50 USD) one-way. Negotiate the fare before getting in.

tulum mexico airport nearest

Getting to Tulum from Tulum Airport (TUY)

With the opening of Tulum International Airport, travelers now have a convenient gateway right to the heart of Tulum.although there is no uber in tulum airport. The airport is located just 15-20 minutes from Tulum’s town center and hotel zone. Here are your options for getting to your hotel:

  1. Private Transfer: A shared transfer from Tulum airport or a Private Shuttle. The easiest and most convenient way!
  2. 🚊 Airport Shuttle: The easiest way to get to your hotel. Book a shared or private shuttle in advance and your driver will be waiting for you outside arrivals. Shared shuttles cost about $20-30 USD per person, while private transfers are $50-80 USD per group.
  3. 🚕 Taxi: Tulum airport taxis are readily available outside the terminal. The ride to Tulum town or the beach zone is about 500-700 pesos ($25-35 USD), depending on your destination. Look for the official taxi stands and agree on the fare before getting in.

RELATED: Top Tulum Luxury Resorts & Visit Tulum Ruins Guide

How to Get Around Tulum: How do I get around in Tulum?

Just because Uber’s a no-go doesn’t mean you’ll be stranded. Here’s a rundown of all your Tulum transportation options:

tulum transportation

Taxis in Tulum

are there taxis in tulum? Taxis are everywhere in Tulum, and hailing one is as easy as sticking out your arm.

how much are taxis in tulum

Tulum Taxi Fares within Tulum town are inexpensive, usually around 100-150 pesos ($5-8 USD). But for longer trips, like from town to the beach or hotel zone, you can expect to pay 250-500 pesos ($13-26) each way, depending on your negotiating skills.

Insider tips for taking taxis in Tulum:

  • There is no Uber in Tulum. Taxis are the main form of private transport.
  • Always agree on the price before getting in, as drivers can quote wildly different fares.
  • Rates are per car, not per person, so you can split the fare with friends.
  • Have small bills or exact change, as drivers rarely have much on hand.
  • Brush up on your Spanish numbers so you can confidently agree on the price.
  • Consider hiring a driver for the day to take you to sites like the cenotes. Negotiate a flat rate.

Sample taxi tulum fares: how much do taxis cost in Tulum taxi cost

Destination | Price (pesos) Tulum town to ruins | 150-200 Tulum town to public beach | 200-300 Tulum town to hotel zone | 250-500 Tulum ruins to cenote | 100-200

Is it safe to take taxis in Tulum?

Yes, taking taxis in Tulum is generally safe for tourists. Taxis are regulated by the government and are a common mode of transportation for both locals and visitors. However, as with any form of travel, it’s always a good idea to take some basic precautions to ensure a safe and pleasant experience. Here are some tips:

  1. 🚕 Use Official Taxis Stick to using official, registered taxis in Tulum. These are white cars with a “Taxi” sign on the roof. Avoid unlicensed or unmarked taxis, as they may not be insured or regulated.
  2. 💰 Agree on the Fare Upfront Before getting into the taxi, always confirm the fare with the driver. Taxis in Tulum don’t use meters, so fares are based on set rates between common destinations. Agreeing on the price upfront avoids any misunderstandings or overcharging at the end of the ride.
  3. 💸 Have Cash Ready Taxis in Tulum only accept cash (in Mexican pesos), so be sure to have enough on hand to cover your fare and tip. Many drivers won’t have change for large bills, so try to carry smaller denominations.
  4. 🗺️ Know Your Destination Have a clear idea of where you’re going and communicate this to the driver. If you’re headed to a lesser-known spot, it can be helpful to have the address written down or a map to show the driver. Most taxi drivers are honest, but clear communication helps avoid any detours or misunderstandings.
  5. 🕰️ Be Cautious at Night While Tulum is generally safe, it’s always a good idea to be extra cautious when taking taxis late at night, especially if you’re alone. Try to have your hotel or a restaurant call a taxi for you, rather than hailing one off the street. If possible, ride with a friend or group.
  6. 🚕 Trust Your Instincts If for any reason you feel uncomfortable or unsafe with a particular driver or taxi, trust your gut and find another ride. It’s always better to err on the side of caution.

RELATED: Best Things To Do in Tulum Ultimate Tulum Travel Guide

How to find taxis in Tulum?

Finding a taxi in Tulum is generally easy, as they are readily available throughout the town and hotel zone. Here’s how to hail a taxi and some tips for using them:

  1. 🚕 Hailing a Taxi on the Street The easiest way to get a taxi in Tulum is to simply wave one down on the street. Taxis in Tulum are white and have a “Taxi” sign on the roof. They’re constantly circulating, so you shouldn’t have to wait long to spot one.
  2. 📍 Finding Taxis at Taxi Stands There are also designated taxi stands in busy areas like downtown Tulum, the beach road, and major hotels and attractions. Look for a line of white taxis parked and waiting for passengers.
  3. 📞 Calling a Taxi If you’re in a more remote area or can’t find a taxi on the street, you can call a taxi company to come pick you up. Ask your hotel or a local business for the number of a reliable taxi service. Some popular ones include:
Coco Tran — Aesthetic Travel Blog By Film Photographer Coco Tran https://cocotran.com/uber-in-tulum-best-way-to-get-around-in-tulum/
Tulum ruins — the most beautiful ruins by the ocean

Do taxis in Tulum take credit card?

  1. 💰 Paying for Your Taxi Taxis in Tulum don’t use meters, so it’s important to agree on the fare before getting in the car. Rates are generally fixed between common destinations, but it’s still good to confirm the price upfront. Most taxis only accept cash (Mexican pesos), so be sure to have some on hand.

Do you tip cab drivers in Tulum?

Yes, it’s customary to tip taxi drivers in Tulum and throughout Mexico. While tipping isn’t mandatory, it’s a common practice and a way to show appreciation for good service. Here’s what you need to know about tipping taxi drivers in Tulum:

  1. 💸 How Much to Tip The standard tip for taxi drivers in Tulum is 10-20% of the fare, similar to what you’d tip in the US or Canada. For example, if your fare is 100 pesos, you could round up to 120 pesos to include a 20-peso tip.

If the driver helps with your luggage, provides exceptional service, or goes out of their way to assist you, you may want to tip on the higher end of that range or even a bit more.

  1. 💰 Tipping in Cash Taxi drivers in Tulum deal almost exclusively in cash, so it’s best to tip in Mexican pesos. Tulum taxis don’t accept credit cards, so be sure to have small bills or coins on hand for tipping.
  2. 🗣️ Tipping Etiquette When paying for your taxi ride, you can simply hand the driver the fare plus the tip amount and say “gracias” (thank you). If you need change back, make it clear that you’re including a tip. For example, if the fare is 80 pesos and you hand the driver 100 pesos, you can say “90 pesos” to indicate that you’re tipping 10 pesos and would like 10 pesos back in change.
  3. 🚕 Tipping for Tours or Airport Transfers If you hire a taxi driver for a private tour or an airport transfer, it’s customary to tip a bit more, especially if the driver provides commentary or goes above and beyond to make your experience enjoyable. In these cases, a tip of 15-20% is appropriate.
  4. 😊 Tipping is Appreciated While taxi drivers in Tulum don’t necessarily expect a tip, they certainly appreciate the gesture. Tipping is a way to show gratitude for a safe and pleasant ride, and it can go a long way in making someone’s day.

Renting Bicycles Tulum: Getting around Tulum on bikes

is a bicycle lover’s paradise. The town is compact and flat, with a generous bike lane running down the main avenue. You can easily pedal from the ADO bus station to the far end of the pueblo in about 10 minutes. Lots of locals get around by bike, so you’ll be in good company.

bike rental tulum

Many hotels in Tulum and Luxury hotels in Tulum provide free bikes for guests, which is an awesome perk. If yours doesn’t, rentals are easy to find and cost about 100-150 pesos ($5-8) per day, or less if you rent by the week. Most shops include a lock, so you can safely park your ride while you pop into shops or stop for a taco.

The 2-mile beach road is also cyclable, with a dedicated bike path linking the town and playa. It’s narrow and bumpy in spots, but a scenic way to reach the ocean that beats sitting in traffic. Just be ready to break a sweat and don’t forget the sunscreen.

Where to rent a bike in Tulum:

  • Ola Bike Tulum: Av. Tulum between Calles 6 and 8
  • Kelly’s Bike Rental Tulum: Av. Coba Sur 5
  • Iguana Bike Tulum: Av. Tulum and Calle 8

Renting a Car in Tulum

If you want to do day trips outside Tulum, a rental car offers flexibility. In my experience, driving around Tulum isn’t too stressful, but dealing with traffic and parking in town can be a pain, especially on weekends and holidays. You’re often better off using taxis or tours for out-of-town adventures.

Should you decide to rent wheels, I recommend booking in advance from a reputable agency, as the best deals can sell out. Rates average $40-60 USD per day for an economy car, plus mandatory insurance. An international driver’s permit technically isn’t required, but it’s a good idea.

The drive from the Cancun airport to Tulum takes about 1.5-2 hours. The coastal highway 307 is in good condition, but watch for speed bumps in towns. There are gas stations along the way if you need to fill up or take a bathroom break.

Where to rent a car in Tulum

  • Easy Way Rent a Car: Av. Tulum between Orion and Polar
  • America Car Rental: Av. Coba between Sagitario and Sol
  • MEX Rent A Car: Av. Coba 62, across from Oxxo

Tips for Renting a Car in Tulum:

  • Book in advance for the best rates, especially in high season. I recommend Discover Cars for the best deals and free cancelation.
  • A car rental averages about $30/day and you’ll need a credit card and driver’s license. Some agencies may require an international license.
  • Driving in Tulum is straightforward, but avoid driving at night and stick to main highways.
  • Gas up before returning your car to avoid extra fees. There are Pemex stations along the main highway 307.
  1. Taking Taxis in Tulum If you’d rather leave the driving to someone else, taxis are ubiquitous in Tulum. Just step outside and hail one, or have your hotel or restaurant call one for you. Taxis are generally safe, but they’re also the most expensive way to get around.

Tulum Day Trips and Excursions in Tulum

If you want to explore Tulum’s surroundings without the hassle of driving, there are tons of great tours and excursions. You can visit Mayan ruins, swim in cenotes, snorkel in the Caribbean, or hike in the jungle, all with transportation included.

Group tours are an economical option that let you meet fellow travelers. If you prefer a private experience or are traveling with friends/family, you can also book private tours with door-to-door service.

Some of the most popular Tulum day trips are:

  • Coba Ruins: Climb an ancient Mayan pyramid in the jungle and take a dip in nearby cenotes.
  • Sian Ka’an Biosphere Reserve: Spot wildlife and float down turquoise canals in this protected coastal ecosystem.
  • Chichen Itza: Marvel at one of the New7Wonders of the World, a massive Mayan archaeological complex. Get there early to beat the crowds.
  • Akumal: Snorkel with sea turtles just off the beach in this low-key bay 20 minutes north of Tulum. Go first thing for the calmest conditions.
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Scooters in Tulum

For a little extra zip, you can upgrade from pedal power to a scooter rental. Prices are reasonable, averaging 500-800 pesos ($26-42) for a 24-hour rental. Most shops require a deposit or collateral like your passport, so be prepared for that. 

Just a note: this is a dangerous way to get around in Tulum so I don’t recommend it. The roads are badly lit and can be bumpy so you’re better off opting for other options. Scooter accidents are the number one reason for casualties anywhere in the world.

Scooting around lets you cover more ground with the wind in your hair. It’s a fun way to explore Tulum town or take a spin down the beach road. Just go slow and keep your eyes peeled for potholes, speed bumps, and wayward pedestrians.

On Foot walking in Tulum mexico

If you’re staying in town, hoofing it is a totally viable way to get around. The pueblo is compact and walkable, especially along the main drag of Av. Tulum. Sidewalks are in decent shape in the center, but get a bit ragged on side streets and as you head further out.

It’s about a 30-45 minute walk from one end of town to the other, depending on your pace. Tulum’s street layout is a grid, so it’s hard to get lost. Strolling is a great way to scope out shops and street art. Plus it’s free and counts as cardio.

The only walking route I don’t recommend is from town to the beach/hotel zone. It’s a 4 km slog along a busy road with sporadic shade. You’re better off springing for a taxi or pedaling that stretch.

Tips for walking in Tulum:

  • Stay hydrated. Tulum is hot and humid year-round.
  • Wear comfy shoes. Flip flops are fine for short jaunts, but you’ll want sturdy sandals or sneakers for longer walks.
  • Bring a hat and sunglasses. That Caribbean sun is no joke.
  • Keep valuables secure and don’t flash wads of cash. Petty theft can happen.
Coco Tran — Aesthetic Travel Blog By Film Photographer Coco Tran https://cocotran.com/uber-in-tulum-best-way-to-get-around-in-tulum/

Colectivos and ADO Buses in Tulum

The cheapest way to get around Tulum is by colectivo (shared van) or ADO bus. Colectivos run up and down the main highway, connecting Tulum to other towns along the coast. ADO buses do longer routes to places like Cancun, Playa del Carmen, and Valladolid.

🚐 Tips for Colectivos:

  • Stand by the highway and flag one down. It will have a sign with its destination.
  • Pay the driver in cash when you board. Fares are usually 20-40 pesos.
  • Colectivos can get crowded and don’t have A/C. Avoid if you have lots of luggage.

🚌 Tips for ADO Buses:

  • Book tickets online at ado.com.mx or at the bus station. Digital tickets are accepted.
  • ADO has a station in downtown Tulum on Avenida Tulum.
  • 1st class buses have A/C, bathrooms, and movies. 2nd class is cheaper but more basic.
  • Allow plenty of time to get to the station, as buses leave promptly.

Other Frequently Asked Questions About Uber in Tulum

Is there Lyft in Tulum? No, Lyft does not operate in Tulum either. Taxis are the main form of ride sharing.

Is there Uber in Cancun or Playa del Carmen? Uber has a small presence in Cancun, but it doesn’t have pick-up rights at the airport and conflicts with taxi drivers are common. There is no Uber service in Playa del Carmen.

How do I get from the Cancun airport to Tulum? The cheapest way is the ADO bus, which costs about 350 pesos ($18 USD) one way and takes 2-2.5 hours. Private shuttles and taxis are pricier but more convenient. I don’t recommend renting a car at the Cancun airport as you’re unlikely to use it much once in Tulum.

Transportation from Cancun to Tulum Options: Service | Cost (USD) | Time ADO Bus | $18 one way | 2-2.5 hours Private Shuttle | $75-150 one way | 1.5-2 hours Taxi | $100-150 one way | 1.5-2 hours Rental Car | $40-60/day + gas | 1.5-2 hours

Is it safe to take taxis in Tulum? Yes, taxis are generally safe in Tulum. Drivers may try to overcharge tourists, but you’re unlikely to encounter any sketchy situations safety-wise. If a price seems ridiculously high, just move on to the next cab.

Can I pay for taxis or transportation with a credit card in Tulum? No, cash is king for taxis and most other transportation in Tulum. Always bring pesos to pay for your rides. A few taxi drivers may have a portable credit card reader, but it’s the exception rather than the rule.

Final Thoughts on Getting Around Tulum Without Uber Uber may be a no-show in Tulum, but that doesn’t mean you’ll be stranded. From breezy bike rides to budget-friendly buses to taxis galore, you have plenty of ways to navigate Tulum’s town, beaches and beyond. Familiarize yourself with your options and you’ll be zipping around like a local in no time.

To recap, here’s how to make the most of Tulum transportation:

  1. Embrace two wheels and rent a bike or scooter to explore the pueblo and beach
  2. Hail taxis freely within town, but brace for higher fares to the beach/hotel zone
  3. Consider an ADO bus or private shuttle from the Cancun airport vs. a rental car
  4. Bring comfy shoes and stay hydrated if you plan to walk
  5. Book day tours for hassle-free adventures to ruins, cenotes and nature reserves

Now that you know how to conquer Tulum without Uber, you’re ready to experience all the magic this boho beach haven has to offer. Enjoy the journey and happy exploring!

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