Arched Entrance to the Yellow City in Izamal, Mexico

The 45 Most Magical pueblos mágicos in Mexico for an Enchanting Trip

Save To Read Later:

Looking to discover the most charming small towns in Mexico? Pueblos Magicos (pueblos mágicos) or Magical Towns, showcase the best of Mexico’s rich history, culture, traditions and natural beauty. With 177 designated Pueblos Magicos dotted across Mexico, there’s an enchanting town to captivate every type of traveler.

Whether you want to wander cobblestone streets lined with colorful colonial buildings, marvel at ancient archeological ruins, relax on pristine beaches, sample authentic regional cuisine, or experience Mexico’s living indigenous cultures — a visit to one or more Pueblos Magicos delivers magic you’ll never forget. Not sure which pueblo magico to visit first? Read on to discover the 45 most magical Pueblos Magicos in Mexico that need to be on your 2024 Mexico itinerary.

The 45 Most Magical Pueblos Magicos in Mexico for an Enchanting Trip

No time to read it all? Here are the highlights:

  • The Mexican government designates select towns as Pueblos Magicos for their historical, cultural, architectural, or natural significance
  • As of 2024, there are 177 official Pueblos Magicos located across 32 Mexican states
  • Pueblos Magicos range from coastal towns with stunning beaches to colonial cities and indigenous villages
  • Tequila, the town where tequila originated, is one of the most popular Pueblos Magicos
  • The yellow city of Izamal is one of only two Mexican towns nominated for UNESCO World Heritage status
  • Taxco is famed for its silver workshops and magnificent Holy Week celebrations
  • San Cristobal de las Casas offers fascinating indigenous culture, excellent shopping, and great food
  • Bacalar’s lagoon of seven colors is a natural wonder you have to see to believe

Want to know more? Keep reading for all the magical details on the best Pueblos Magicos in Mexico.

What Exactly Are Pueblos Magicos?

Towns don’t get the Pueblo Magico title simply for being charming and picturesque – though those are often delightful side benefits. The Mexican Secretariat of Tourism established the Pueblos Magicos program in 2001 to recognize towns that offer something special to visitors and help drive tourism to different parts of the country.

Official Pueblos Magicos are selected based on these primary criteria:

  • A population of at least 5000 people
  • Located no more than 124 miles (200 km) from a major tourist destination
  • Possess symbolic and historical attributes, authentic traditions, crafts, cuisine, and more
  • Demonstrate a commitment and capacity for tourism

Tours & Transportation to Pueblo Magicos

To visit Mexico’s magical towns, you have a few options:

  1. Book a guided tour: Many tour operators offer day trips or multi-day excursions to the most popular Pueblos Magicos from major cities like Mexico City, Guadalajara, Oaxaca, etc. This is a great hassle-free option if you don’t want to worry about logistics.
  2. Drive yourself: Renting a car gives you the freedom and flexibility to visit pueblos on your own schedule. All Pueblos Magicos are reachable by well-maintained highways. Just be sure to drive only during daylight hours for safety.
  3. Take a bus: Mexico has an extensive network of bus routes, and you can reach many Pueblos Magicos by bus from major cities. ADO, Primera Plus, ETN and Estrella Blanca are some of the most reputable bus companies. Buses are generally very comfortable and reliable.
A skeleton dressed in a costume with flowers on it

The 45 Most Magical Pueblos Magicos de mexico to Visit

Ready to add some magic to your trip to Mexico? From the famous to the undiscovered, these are 45 of the absolute best Pueblos Magicos for an unforgettable experience.

San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato

San Miguel de Allende regularly makes “best small towns” and “best places to retire” lists – and one look at its enchanting colonial center makes it clear why. This high-altitude town in the state of Guanajuato packs in enough beauty and charm for a place 10 times its size.

The breathtaking San Miguel Arcángel Church in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

The heart of San Miguel is El Jardín, a lively plaza shaded by laurel trees and anchored by the iconic pink neo-Gothic spires of La Parroquia de San Miguel Arcángel, the town’s parish church. From here, narrow cobblestone streets radiate outwards, lined with colorful facades and hiding secret patios and gardens behind their walls.

San Miguel is a great town for wandering, popping into art galleries and boutiques, checking out its excellent restaurants, or just soaking in the magically romantic atmosphere. No wonder it’s a longtime favorite of artists, writers, and others in search of inspiration and beauty.

San Miguel de Allende travel tips:

  • Visit the Mask Museum for an incredible collection of ceremonial and decorative masks from Mexico and beyond
  • Take an art workshop or class at the Instituto Allende or Bellas Artes
  • Enjoy steaming bowls of pozole at traditional local markets

Ready to book your trip to San Miguel De Allende

Tulum, Quintana Roo

Tulum is a stunning coastal town located on the Caribbean coast of the Yucatan Peninsula, known for its breathtaking beaches, ancient Mayan ruins, and vibrant culture. The town has become increasingly popular in recent years, attracting visitors from all over the world with its laid-back bohemian vibe and stunning natural beauty.

One of the top attractions in Tulum is the ancient Mayan ruins that sit atop a cliff overlooking the turquoise waters of the Caribbean Sea. The ruins date back to the 13th century and include several well-preserved structures such as El Castillo, the Temple of the Frescoes, and the Temple of the Descending God. Visitors can explore the ruins on their own or take a guided tour to learn more about the fascinating history and culture of the ancient Maya.

Coco Tran — Aesthetic Travel Blog By Film Photographer Coco Tran https://cocotran.com/pueblos-magicos-de-mexico/

RELATED: Best Things To Do in Tulum Ultimate Tulum Travel Guide

Another highlight of Tulum is its stunning beaches, which are consistently ranked among the most beautiful in the world. The town’s main beach, Playa Paraiso, is a long stretch of soft white sand bordered by crystal-clear turquoise waters and lush jungle vegetation. Visitors can relax on the beach, swim in the warm waters, or take part in a variety of water sports such as snorkeling, scuba diving, and paddleboarding.

In addition to its natural beauty, Tulum is also known for its vibrant culture and bohemian atmosphere. The town is home to a thriving arts scene, with numerous galleries, studios, and street art installations showcasing the work of local and international artists. Visitors can also explore the town’s many boutiques, cafes, and restaurants, which offer a unique blend of traditional Mexican and contemporary international cuisine.

Tulum travel tips:

  • Visit the Tulum Ruins early in the morning or late in the afternoon to avoid the crowds and the heat
  • Take a dip in one of the many nearby cenotes, which are natural swimming holes formed by the collapse of limestone bedrock
  • Rent a bicycle and explore the town’s many colorful streets and hidden corners
  • Sample traditional Yucatecan dishes like cochinita pibil, panuchos, and sopa de lima at one of the many local restaurants and street food stalls

pueblos magicos de jalisco

Tequila, Jalisco

No trip to the state of Jalisco is complete without a visit to the town that tequila made famous – and vice versa. Santiago de Tequila (usually just called Tequila) is one of Mexico’s most well-known Pueblos Magicos. And for good reason.

A Colorful Sign in the Town Square of Tequila, Jalisco, Mexico

Tequila travel tips:

  • Hop aboard the Jose Cuervo Express for an all-day journey from Guadalajara to Tequila
  • Visit the National Museum of Tequila to learn the history of Mexico’s most iconic spirit
  • Take an excursion to sprawling agave farms surrounding the town

This is the heart of Mexico’s tequila country, where endless fields of blue agave blanket the landscape in a region declared a UNESCO World Heritage site. Visit historic distilleries and haciendas, ride through agave fields on an express train, and sample authentic tequila right from the source. Salud!

Mazamitla, Jalisco

Nestled in the pine-covered mountains of southern Jalisco, Mazamitla is a scenic town that’s popular with outdoorsy types. The surrounding countryside is crisscrossed with hiking trails through fragrant oak and pine forests, leading to waterfalls, lookout points, and tranquil picnic spots.

In town, Mazamitla’s main plaza is a charming spot to relax and people-watch. Browse the outdoor street market for locally made jams, liqueurs, and artisanal cheeses, or warm up with a cup of Mazamitla’s signature beverage, calientito – a spiced drink made with brown sugar, rum, and fruit.

Mazamitla travel tips:

  • Hike to the Salto del Nogal, a 100-foot waterfall in a lush forest setting
  • Take a guided horseback ride through the scenic countryside
  • Visit the Museo de Charrería to learn about Mexico’s traditional equestrian sport

Pueblos mágicos

Taxco, Guerrero

If there’s a town in Mexico that looks like it’s been plucked straight from a postcard, it has to be Taxco. Clinging to the steep slopes of Guerrero’s Sierra Madre mountains, Taxco’s winding cobblestone streets are lined with immaculately preserved whitewashed buildings with red-tiled roofs. It’s an astonishingly beautiful place.

Taxco has been an important center of silver mining since the 16th century. Today its main plaza and hillside streets are packed with silversmiths selling finely crafted jewelry. The magnificent Baroque cathedral of Santa Prisca presides over it all.

Visit during Holy Week to witness Taxco’s elaborate, spellbinding celebrations. Penitent processions wind through the streets, religious passion plays reenact Biblical stories, and colorful sawdust carpets decorate the central plaza.

RELATED: Ultimate Guide To Hot Air balloons over Teotihuacan pyramids

Taxco travel tips:

  • Shop for quality silver jewelry and other handicrafts at the Saturday silver tianguis (open-air market)
  • Check out the bizarre, macabre figures in Casa Humboldt’s Museo de la Máscara
  • Ride the teleferico (cable car) for breathtaking bird’s-eye views over Taxco

pueblos mágicos Magic Towns

Izamal, Yucatán

This stunning “Yellow City” is one of only two Mexican towns nominated for UNESCO World Heritage status. An important pilgrimage site since ancient Maya times, Izamal dazzles visitors today with streets and buildings awash in a cheerful coat of golden-yellow paint.

The effect is absolutely mesmerizing. Rising above it all is the massive Franciscan monastery Convento de San Antonio de Padua, built atop the imposing ruins of the ancient Maya acropolis Pop-Hol-Chac in the 16th century.

izamal

RELATED: Ultimate Izamal Travel Guide

Horse-drawn carriages clip-clop through Izamal’s historic center, a place where time seems to have stood still. Just outside town, climb the pyramid Kinich Kakmó for wonderful views of the countryside and town.

Izamal travel tips:

  • Hop in a horse-drawn carriage for a tour around town
  • Fuel up on traditional Yucatecan dishes like papadzules, panuchos, and sopa de lima
  • Visit nearby cenotes Xbatun and Kankirixche to swim in crystal-clear underground pools

Bacalar, Quintana Roo

Magical is the perfect word to describe Bacalar and its crown jewel – the multihued Lagoon of Seven Colors. Located in southern Quintana Roo state, about a 4-hour drive from Cancun or Tulum, Bacalar feels a world away from the throngs of tourists that pack the Riviera Maya.

People on Beach

The dazzling 26-mile-long freshwater lagoon that gives the town its name might just be one of the most breathtaking sights you’ll ever see. Shifting shades of brilliant turquoise and blue stretch off into the horizon, ringed by pure white limestone and popping against a backdrop of vibrant green jungle.

The colors change with the sun and seasons, but one thing’s for sure: you’ll never tire of gazing at this natural wonder. Bacalar is starting to gain in popularity, but it still feels like an undiscovered gem. For unforgettable beauty in an off-the-beaten-path locale, Bacalar delivers magic in spades.

Bacalar travel tips:

  • Explore the lagoon’s beauty by kayak or sailboat on a guided tour
  • Take a dip at Cenote Azul or Cocalitos, crystal-clear swimming holes on the lagoon’s shore
  • Visit the San Felipe Fort Museum to learn about the area’s fascinating pirate history

Pueblos magicos de mexico

San Cristóbal de las Casas, Chiapas

High in the pine-forested mountains of southern Mexico, San Cristóbal de las Casas beckons visitors to explore a fascinating mix of colonial architecture and living Maya culture. As the cultural capital of Chiapas state, it’s a place where indigenous traditions and modern flair blend seamlessly together.

Amble past the yellow-and-white Catedral de San Cristóbal on the town’s main square. Investigate the Museum of Mayan Medicine’s exhibits on ancient and present-day indigenous healing practices. Go shopping for colorful Chiapas textiles handwoven on traditional backstrap looms. And fuel up on the region’s famed organic coffee as you plan your next move.

Town Buildings with Hill under Clouds behind

On the city’s outskirts, fascinating Maya villages carry on traditional lifestyles and host weekly markets that draw locals and visitors alike. With so much to see and do, and such an alluring mountain setting, it’s no wonder San Cristóbal is considered one of Mexico’s great colonial cities.

San Cristóbal de las Casas travel tips:

  • Stock up on fresh fruits, veggies, and local handicrafts at the daily market off the main square
  • Gain a better understanding of the 1994 Zapatista uprising at Chiapas Museum of Resistance
  • Take a day trip to Maya villages like Chamula and Zinacantán to witness indigenous customs

Pátzcuaro, Michoacán

Perched on the shore of its namesake lake, the peaceful town of Pátzcuaro lures visitors with its uniquely mestizo atmosphere – a seamless blend of indigenous and Spanish colonial influences. The town is built around Plaza Vasco de Quiroga, a lively square named for the region’s first bishop who helped protect indigenous rights.

Pátzcuaro is especially known for its Day of the Dead traditions, which have been celebrated here since pre-Hispanic times. Leading up to the November 1-2 holiday, local markets brim with marigold flowers, sugar skulls, and other altar offerings. On the nights of the dead, locals gather for vigils in the town’s cemeteries, a hauntingly beautiful sight.

Templo de El Sagrario in the City of Patzcuaro

Any time of year, Pátzcuaro makes a great base for exploring the villages and islands of Lake Pátzcuaro. Take a boat to the island of Janitzio to see an enormous hilltop statue of independence hero José María Morelos. Shop for brilliant lacquerware and copperware produced by local artisans. Or just grab a park bench and watch the region’s P’urhépecha people go about their business in traditional dress.

Pátzcuaro travel tips:

  • Take an evening stroll around Plaza Vasco de Quiroga as locals gather to visit and relax
  • Visit the House of Eleven Patios for handmade crafts from around the region
  • Witness moving Day of the Dead celebrations on the islands of Janitzio and Pacanda

Cholula, Puebla

The town of Cholula is synonymous with one very big claim to fame: the Great Pyramid of Cholula, the largest pyramid on Earth by volume. Not that you’d necessarily know it at first glance. What just appears to be a huge, grass-covered hill topped by a Spanish colonial church actually hides an enormous pyramid built in stages between 200 BC to 1500 AD.

Visitors can explore a 5-mile network of tunnels excavated by archeologists in the early 20th century. The site’s excellent museum does an admirable job of detailing the pre-Hispanic city of Cholula’s rise to prominence as a trade and pilgrimage center.

Ornate Mosaics Dome of Iglesia de Nuestra Señora de los Remedios

The magic continues into the present day, as Cholula’s zócalo (main plaza) and side streets brim with colonial-era charm. Peek inside the splendid Capilla Real, where 49 domes are covered floor to ceiling with colorful Talavera tiles. Grab a table at one of Cholula’s many alfresco cafes and watch the world go by. And chow down on a cemita, the town’s famed oversized sandwich packed with meat and veggies.

Cholula travel tips:

  • Climb the 65 meters to the top of the Great Pyramid for striking views of the town below
  • Shop for authentic Talavera ceramics, traditional clothing, and artisan crafts
  • Visit the Container City for an open-air art experience housed in brightly painted shipping containers

Todos Santos, Baja California Sur

Situated between the cactus-dotted foothills of the Sierra de la Laguna mountains and the sparkling Pacific Ocean, it’s no surprise that Todos Santos has been attracting artists and travelers for decades.

Many come simply to enjoy the town’s stunning beaches and consistent surf breaks. But Todos Santos has a thriving arts and culture scene too. Dozens of galleries showcase works by local painters, sculptors, muralists, and other artists. The town regularly hosts art festivals, film festivals, and music events.

Logo of Todos Santos Town

A mile from the town’s main plaza, the iconic Hotel California with its quirky handpainted sign has no actual relation to The Eagles’ song. But it’s still fun to visit for a meal or a drink.

From October to April, visit the beautiful beach of Los Cerritos to watch migratory whales swimming just off shore. And if you’re craving a big-city buzz, Los Cabos is just an hour’s drive away.

Todos Santos travel tips:

  • Catch a spectacular sunset from Punta Lobos beach
  • Take a Mexican cooking class and learn to make regional specialties like machaca and tamales
  • Browse for eclectic souvenirs at boho-funky shops along Calle Benito Juárez

Real de Catorce, San Luis Potosí

Nestled in a remote corner of the Sierra Madre mountains in northern Mexico, reaching Real de Catorce (often just called “Real”) feels a bit like stepping into an old Western movie. The only way in or out is through the 1.5-mile-long Ogarrio Tunnel, which used to serve as the main access to the town’s lucrative silver mines.

Founded in 1772, Real de Catorce boomed during the early 19th century, when it was said to produce half the silver in Mexico. Then the bottom fell out in the early 20th century, and the town became a virtual ghost town.

Una vista hermosa

Today, Real’s dusty streets are flanked by beautiful stone buildings that seem frozen in time. Wild mustangs roam the outskirts of town, where crumbling walls and mine shafts recall the town’s former glory days.

Locals say the surrounding Wirikuta desert has powerful energetic and healing properties. On the weekly market day, Huichol indigenous people – some of Mexico’s last remaining peoples living traditional lifestyles – mingle with bohemian travelers and pilgrims who flock to Real de Catorce’s 18th-century parish church. It all adds up to an unforgettably mystical atmosphere.

Real de Catorce travel tips:

  • Visit Casa de la Moneda for an overview of the town’s silver boom history
  • Join a horseback riding tour through the Wirikuta desert
  • Try the local specialty catorceño, a rich stew made from goat meat or mutton

Valladolid, Yucatán

Step back in time in the colorful colonial city of Valladolid, located in the heart of the Yucatán Peninsula. The city’s main square, Parque Francisco Cantón Rosado, is a great spot to people-watch and admire the magnificent San Servacio Church.

Valladolid

Feast your eyes on the city’s many pastel-hued buildings, then satisfy your appetite with delicious Yucatecan dishes like cochinita pibil (slow-roasted pork) and papadzules (egg enchiladas). Just outside the city, cool off with a swim in the breathtakingly beautiful Cenote Zaci.

Valladolid travel tips:

  • Shop for authentic Yucatecan clothing and textiles at the Mercado Municipal
  • Visit the Convent of San Bernardino de Siena for a sound and light show depicting the city’s history
  • Take a day trip to the nearby Mayan ruins of Chichén Itzá or Ek Balam

Tula, Tamaulipas

Located in the northeastern state of Tamaulipas, Tula is a small town with a big personality. Founded in the 16th century, Tula’s main plaza is a stunning example of colonial architecture, anchored by the impressive Templo de San Antonio.

Tula is known for its traditional leather goods, particularly the elaborately embroidered leather jackets called cueras. You can watch artisans craft these jackets and other leather items at workshops throughout the town.

Tula travel tips:

  • Enjoy panoramic views of the town from the top of Cerro de Tula hill
  • Cool off with a dip in the crystal-clear waters of the Río Tula
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like carne seca (dried beef) and asado de puerco (pork stew)

Comala, Colima

Often called the “White Town of America” for its distinctive white buildings and red-tiled roofs, Comala is a picturesque town located in the state of Colima. Writer Juan Rulfo used Comala as the setting for his acclaimed novel “Pedro Páramo,” and the town retains a dreamy, literary feel.

Stroll through the town’s tranquil plazas shaded by palm trees, sample traditional drinks like tuba and tejuino, and soak your cares away at one of several nearby thermal springs.

Comala travel tips:

  • Hike through the lush subtropical forest of the La María Ecological Reserve
  • Try the town’s unique version of pozole, made with pork and green tomatoes
  • Visit the Nogueras Cultural Center, housed in a beautiful 19th-century hacienda

Cuetzalan, Puebla

Cuetzalan is a gorgeous town in the Sierra Norte mountains of Puebla, known for its indigenous Nahua culture and stunning natural beauty. The town’s main square features a unique double-decker Moorish-style pavilion, a legacy of the Nahuas’ history of resistance against the Spanish.

On Sundays, the town hosts the Tianguis Artesanal, a colorful market where Nahua people from surrounding villages gather to sell handmade textiles, pottery, jewelry, and other crafts. Don’t miss the chance to see the Voladores (“flying men”) perform their death-defying pole dance, an ancient ritual that’s been named an Intangible Cultural Heritage by UNESCO.

Cuetzalan travel tips:

  • Take a guided hike to the Cascadas Las Brisas waterfall and go for a refreshing swim
  • Visit the Museo Comunitario Tohue to learn about Nahua history and culture
  • Stay in one of Cuetzalan’s rustic cabañas overlooking the misty mountain landscape

Papantla, Veracruz

Located in the lush Totonac region of Veracruz, Papantla is a town steeped in indigenous history and tradition. It’s best known as the birthplace of vanilla cultivation, which the Totonac people have grown here since pre-Hispanic times.

Papantla is also famous for the Danza de los Voladores (Dance of the Flyers), an ancient ritual in which men climb to the top of a 100-foot pole, tie themselves to ropes, and descend to the ground in a graceful spinning dance. The town hosts an annual Cumbre Tajín festival each March, showcasing indigenous music, dance, and culture.

Papantla travel tips:

  • Tour a traditional vanilla plantation and buy fragrant vanilla beans to take home
  • Visit the Parque Takilhsukut to see towering replicas of Totonac sculptures
  • Explore the ruins of the ancient Totonac city of El Tajín, a UNESCO World Heritage site

Cosalá, Sinaloa

The small mining town of Cosalá in the mountains of Sinaloa is a hidden gem that’s well worth seeking out. Founded in 1562, Cosalá rose to prominence during the silver mining boom of the 18th and 19th centuries. Today, its main plaza and surrounding streets are lined with opulent mansions and Baroque churches from that era.

Take a guided tour of the La Mina Nuestra Señora de Guadalupe, one of the oldest and most productive silver mines in the region. Visit the Museo Minero to learn about the town’s mining history and see a collection of antique tools and machinery.

Cosalá travel tips:

  • Hike to the Cristo de la Bufa, a massive hilltop statue of Christ with panoramic views
  • Go birdwatching in the Sierra Madre Occidental mountains surrounding the town
  • Attend the colorful Carnaval celebration, held each year before the start of Lent

Metepec, State of Mexico

Located just outside the state capital of Toluca, Metepec is a charming town known for its longstanding tradition of ceramic artistry. The town’s signature ceramic trees of life – intricate, brightly painted clay sculptures depicting Biblical scenes – are famous throughout Mexico.

Clear Sky over Los Portales in Metepec

Metepec’s main square is home to an unusual twin-spired church, the Parroquia de San Juan Bautista, as well as a traditional market where you can shop for clay sculptures, textiles, and other handicrafts. On Sundays, the square hosts a lively dance festival with performers in colorful costumes.

Metepec travel tips:

  • Tour the Museo del Barro to learn about the town’s ceramic traditions
  • Ride the teleférico (cable car) to the hilltop Cerro de los Magueyes for panoramic views
  • Sample traditional dishes like barbacoa de borrego (lamb barbecue) and tacos de plaza

Tlalpujahua, Michoacán

Each December, the small mountain town of Tlalpujahua transforms into a glittering wonderland for its annual Festival de Esferas Navideñas (Christmas Sphere Festival). Millions of delicate glass Christmas ornaments, handcrafted by local artisans, adorn the town’s streets, plazas, and buildings.

But Tlalpujahua is worth visiting any time of year for its well-preserved colonial architecture, tranquil forest setting, and friendly small-town atmosphere. Stroll through the shady Plaza Principal, tour the 400-year-old Templo de San Francisco, and shop for colorful glass ornaments to take home.

Tlalpujahua travel tips:

  • Visit the Museo de la Esfera to learn about the town’s glass-blowing traditions
  • Hike to the Cerro del Gallo lookout for panoramic views of the surrounding mountains
  • Take a tour of the historic Santa María de Oxtotilpan gold mine

pueblos magicos hidalgo

Huichapan, Hidalgo

Located in the Mezquital Valley of Hidalgo, Huichapan is a historic town that’s known for its beautiful colonial architecture and nearby hot springs. The town was an important stop on the old camino real (royal road) that connected Mexico City to the northern part of the country, and its well-preserved historic center is a testament to its former importance.

Today, visitors come to Huichapan to relax in the nearby hot springs, which are said to have healing properties. The town is also home to several beautiful churches, including the 16th-century Templo y Ex-Convento de San Mateo, which features a stunning Baroque facade and a peaceful cloister.

Huichapan travel tips:

  • Take a dip in the nearby Grutas Tolantongo hot springs, a series of thermal pools set in a stunning canyon
  • Visit the Museo Regional de la Cultura Hñahñu to learn about the area’s indigenous Otomí culture
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like barbacoa (slow-cooked lamb) and mixiotes (meat cooked in maguey leaves)

Zempoala, Hidalgo

Located in the mountains of Hidalgo, Zempoala is a small town with a fascinating history that dates back to pre-Hispanic times. The town was once a major center of the Toltec civilization, and its main attraction is the nearby archaeological site of Xihuingo, which features a series of impressive pyramids and other structures.

In town, Zempoala’s main square is a charming spot to relax and people-watch, surrounded by colonial-era buildings and shaded by tall trees. Visit the Museo Comunitario to learn about the town’s indigenous history and culture, or take a hike in the surrounding hills to enjoy the area’s natural beauty.

Zempoala travel tips:

  • Take a guided tour of the Xihuingo archaeological site to learn about Toltec history and culture
  • Visit the Ex-Convento de San Antonio, a beautiful 16th-century former monastery
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like mixiotes (meat cooked in maguey leaves) and escamoles (ant larvae, a delicacy sometimes called “insect caviar”)

Huasca de Ocampo, Hidalgo

Located in the mountainous Comarca Minera region of Hidalgo, Huasca de Ocampo is a town with a long and fascinating mining history. The town’s main attraction is the Basaltic Prisms of Santa María Regla, a stunning natural formation of hexagonal basalt columns formed by an ancient lava flow.

Huasca’s town center features a charming main square surrounded by colonial buildings painted in vibrant colors. On weekends, the square hosts a lively market where you can shop for traditional crafts, textiles, and local specialties like barbacoa and pulque.

Huasca de Ocampo travel tips:

  • Take a guided tour of the Real del Monte mining complex to learn about the town’s silver mining history
  • Visit the Museo de los Duendes (Museum of Goblins) to learn about local legends and folklore
  • Hike to the Prismas Basálticos waterfalls for a refreshing swim surrounded by basalt columns

Tecate, Baja California

Located just across the border from California, Tecate is a charming town known for its laid-back atmosphere, beautiful natural setting, and famous namesake beer. The town’s main square, Parque Hidalgo, is a pleasant spot to relax and people-watch, shaded by tall trees and surrounded by colonial-era buildings.

Tecate is also a gateway to the stunning Guadalupe Valley wine region, where you can tour local wineries, sample award-winning vintages, and enjoy gourmet farm-to-table cuisine. Or head to the nearby El Vallecito hot springs for a relaxing soak in mineral-rich waters.

Tecate travel tips:

  • Tour the Tecate Brewery and sample fresh, locally brewed beer
  • Take a scenic drive through the rugged Tecate Peak area
  • Attend the Tecate Mariachi Festival, held each October in Parque Hidalgo

Santiago, Nuevo León

Set in a stunning valley in the mountains of Nuevo León, Santiago is a town with a rich history and plenty of natural beauty. The town’s main square is anchored by the magnificent Parroquia de Santiago Apostol, a 17th-century church with an ornate Baroque facade.

Just outside town, the Cola de Caballo (Horsetail) waterfall is a breathtaking sight, plunging 80 feet into a turquoise pool. Take a hike through the surrounding forest, go horseback riding through the valley, or visit one of several local hot springs for a relaxing soak.

Santiago travel tips:

  • Take a boat tour of the Presa de la Boca, a scenic reservoir surrounded by mountains
  • Shop for traditional wooden furniture and other handicrafts at local workshops
  • Sample regional specialties like machacado con huevo (shredded dried beef with eggs) and carne asada (grilled meat)

Jalpa de Cánovas, Guanajuato

Located in the highlands of Guanajuato, Jalpa de Cánovas is a small town with a big claim to fame: it’s the birthplace of Mexican revolutionary leader Miguel Hidalgo. The town’s main square features a statue of Hidalgo, as well as a museum dedicated to his life and legacy.

Jalpa is also known for its traditional mezcal production. Take a tour of a local mezcal distillery to learn about the centuries-old process of making this smoky agave spirit, and sample some of the region’s finest varieties.

Jalpa de Cánovas travel tips:

  • Visit the Museo Casa Natal de Hidalgo, the house where Miguel Hidalgo was born
  • Attend the Feria Nacional del Mezcal, held each October to celebrate Jalpa’s mezcal tradition
  • Take a scenic hike through the surrounding hills and valleys, known for their natural beauty

pueblos mágicos de mexico

Batopilas, Chihuahua

Nestled deep in the Copper Canyon wilderness of Chihuahua, Batopilas is a remote and stunningly beautiful town with a rich mining history. Founded in the 17th century, Batopilas was once a major center of silver production, and its main square is surrounded by grand colonial mansions built by wealthy mine owners.

Today, Batopilas is a peaceful town that’s popular with adventurous travelers. Hike or ride horseback through the rugged canyon landscape, explore abandoned mine shafts and ghost towns, or visit nearby indigenous Rarámuri communities to learn about their traditional way of life.

Batopilas travel tips:

  • Take a guided tour of the historic La Bufa mine, once one of the richest silver mines in the world
  • Visit the Misión de Satevó, a beautifully preserved 18th-century Jesuit mission
  • Go white-water rafting on the Rio Batopilas, which runs through the heart of the Copper Canyon

Mapimí, Durango

Located in the heart of the Chihuahuan Desert in Durango, Mapimí is a small town with a fascinating history. The town was founded in the 16th century as a mining settlement, and its main square is surrounded by beautiful colonial buildings that date back to that era.

Today, Mapimí is best known as the gateway to the Reserva de la Biósfera Mapimí, a vast and starkly beautiful desert reserve that’s home to a wide variety of plant and animal life. Take a guided tour of the reserve to see rare species like pronghorns, desert bighorn sheep, and golden eagles.

Mapimí travel tips:

  • Visit the Museo de Historia de Mapimí to learn about the town’s mining history
  • Take a scenic drive through the Valle de los Hongos, known for its unusual mushroom-shaped rock formations
  • Go stargazing in the Reserva de la Biósfera Mapimí, one of the best places in Mexico to see the night sky

Bacalar, Quintana Roo

Located on the stunning Lake of the Seven Colors in southern Quintana Roo, Bacalar is a laid-back town that’s perfect for travelers looking to escape the crowds of the Riviera Maya. The town’s main attraction is the lake itself, a crystal-clear body of water that’s known for its striking shades of blue and green.

Take a boat tour of the lake to visit the Cenote Azul, a deep sinkhole with strikingly clear water, and the Isla de los Pájaros, a small island that’s home to a variety of bird species. Back in town, relax in a hammock on the lakeshore, sample fresh seafood at a local restaurant, or take a yoga class at one of several bohemian-chic resorts.

Bacalar travel tips:

  • Rent a kayak or paddleboard to explore the Lake of the Seven Colors at your own pace
  • Visit the Fuerte de San Felipe, a 18th-century Spanish fortress that’s now a museum
  • Take a day trip to the nearby Mayan ruins of Chacchoben or Kohunlich

Sisal, Yucatán

Located on the Gulf coast of the Yucatán Peninsula, Sisal is a small fishing village that’s known for its laid-back atmosphere and beautiful beaches. The town was once a major port for the sisal hemp trade, which gave the town its name.

Today, Sisal is a quiet and relaxing destination that’s perfect for travelers looking to unwind. Take a stroll along the town’s wide, sandy beach, lined with palm trees and thatched-roof palapas. Visit the Museo de la Fibra to learn about the history of the sisal trade, or take a boat tour to spot flamingos and other wildlife in the nearby mangroves.

Sisal travel tips:

  • Take a dip in the calm, shallow waters of the Gulf of Mexico
  • Sample fresh seafood at one of several beachside restaurants
  • Visit the nearby Mayan ruins of Xcambó, an ancient coastal trading center

Pueblos magicos de puebla

Maní, Yucatán

Located in the heart of the Yucatán Peninsula, Maní is a small town with a rich history and a strong connection to Mayan culture. The town was once a major center of the Mayan civilization, and its main square is home to the ruins of a 16th-century Franciscan convent built on top of an ancient Mayan temple.

Today, Maní is known for its traditional Yucatecan cuisine, particularly its famous poc chuc – grilled pork marinated in sour orange juice and served with pickled onions. Take a stroll through the town’s quiet streets, lined with colorful colonial houses, and visit the market to sample local specialties like relleno negro (a spicy turkey stew) and papadzules (egg enchiladas).

Maní travel tips:

  • Visit the Convento de San Miguel Arcángel, built in 1549 on the site of a former Mayan temple
  • Take a cooking class to learn how to make traditional Yucatecan dishes like poc chuc and sopa de lima
  • Explore the nearby Mayan ruins of Mayapán, a major city that rivaled Chichén Itzá in its heyday

Parras de la Fuente, Coahuila

Located in the high desert of Coahuila, Parras de la Fuente is a charming town that’s known for its wine production and stunning natural beauty. The town was founded in the 16th century by Spanish settlers, who discovered that the area’s climate and soil were perfect for growing grapes.

Today, Parras is home to several wineries that produce some of Mexico’s finest vintages. Take a tour of a local winery to learn about the winemaking process and sample some of the region’s best bottles. In town, stroll through the colorful main square, visit the beautiful 18th-century church of Santo Madero, and relax in the shady Plaza del Reloj.

Parras de la Fuente travel tips:

  • Take a scenic drive through the nearby Canon de Fernandez to enjoy stunning desert landscapes
  • Visit the Casa Madero winery, founded in 1597 and the oldest winery in the Americas
  • Sample local specialties like asado de puerco (roast pork) and pan de pulque (bread made with fermented agave sap)

pueblos magicos michoacan

Santa Clara del Cobre, Michoacán

Santa Clara del Cobre is a charming town located in the mountainous region of Michoacán, known for its rich history, stunning architecture, and world-famous copper crafts. The town has been a center of copper production since pre-Hispanic times, and its skilled artisans continue to create beautiful and functional objects using traditional techniques passed down through generations.

One of the top attractions in Santa Clara del Cobre is the Museo del Cobre, a fascinating museum that showcases the town’s rich history and traditions of copper craftsmanship. Visitors can see demonstrations of traditional copper-working techniques, browse a wide selection of beautiful copper objects, and even try their hand at creating their own simple copper crafts.

Another highlight of Santa Clara del Cobre is its stunning architecture, with the town home to several beautiful colonial-era buildings and churches. The Parroquia de Santa Clara, a stunning 18th-century church with an ornate baroque facade, is a particular highlight.

Santa Clara del Cobre travel tips:

  • Take a guided tour of the Museo del Cobre to learn about the town’s rich history and traditions of copper craftsmanship
  • Visit the Mercado Artesanal, a lively market where you can browse and purchase a wide selection of beautiful copper objects and other traditional crafts
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like morisqueta (a type of rice and bean dish) and corundas (a type of triangular tamale)

Angangueo, Michoacán

Located in the mountains of eastern Michoacán, Angangueo is a small town that’s best known as a jumping-off point for visiting the nearby Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve. Each winter, millions of monarch butterflies migrate from the United States and Canada to the reserve’s forests, creating one of nature’s most spectacular displays.

In town, Angangueo’s colorful houses and cobblestone streets have a charming, old-fashioned feel. Visit the Museo de la Mariposa Monarca to learn about the butterfly migration and the area’s natural history, or take a stroll through the lively market to shop for local handicrafts and sample regional specialties like corundas (triangular tamales) and churipo (a hearty meat and vegetable stew).

Angangueo travel tips:

  • Visit the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve between November and March to witness the butterfly migration
  • Take a horseback ride through the surrounding mountains to enjoy stunning views of the countryside
  • Attend the Festival de la Flor de Cempasúchil, a lively Day of the Dead celebration held each November

Santa Clara del Cobre, Michoacán

Santa Clara del Cobre is a charming town located in the mountainous region of Michoacán, known for its rich history, stunning architecture, and world-famous copper crafts. The town has been a center of copper production since pre-Hispanic times, and its skilled artisans continue to create beautiful and functional objects using traditional techniques passed down through generations.

One of the top attractions in Santa Clara del Cobre is the Museo del Cobre, a fascinating museum that showcases the town’s rich history and traditions of copper craftsmanship. Visitors can see demonstrations of traditional copper-working techniques, browse a wide selection of beautiful copper objects, and even try their hand at creating their own simple copper crafts.

Another highlight of Santa Clara del Cobre is its stunning architecture, with the town home to several beautiful colonial-era buildings and churches. The Parroquia de Santa Clara, a stunning 18th-century church with an ornate baroque facade, is a particular highlight.

Santa Clara del Cobre travel tips:

  • Take a guided tour of the Museo del Cobre to learn about the town’s rich history and traditions of copper craftsmanship
  • Visit the Mercado Artesanal, a lively market where you can browse and purchase a wide selection of beautiful copper objects and other traditional crafts
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like morisqueta (a type of rice and bean dish) and corundas (a type of triangular tamale)

El Oro de Hidalgo, State of Mexico

Located in the mountains of the State of Mexico, El Oro de Hidalgo is a charming town that’s known for its rich mining history and stunning architecture. The town was founded in the 16th century after the discovery of gold and silver deposits in the area, and it quickly became one of Mexico’s most important mining centers.

Today, El Oro’s main square is surrounded by beautiful neoclassical buildings that date back to the town’s heyday, including the stunning Palacio Municipal and the Teatro Juárez. Take a tour of the Museo de la Minería to learn about the town’s mining history, or visit the nearby Presa Brockman, a beautiful lake surrounded by pine forests.

El Oro de Hidalgo travel tips:

  • Take a ride on the town’s historic trolley car, which offers stunning views of the surrounding mountains
  • Visit the Parroquia de la Santa Veracruz, a beautiful 18th-century church with an ornate Baroque facade
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like trucha al mojo de ajo (garlic-sauced trout) and quesadillas de flor de calabaza (squash blossom quesadillas)

Candela, Coahuila

Located in the rugged mountains of Coahuila, Candela is a small town that’s known for its stunning natural beauty and rich history. The town was founded in the 18th century as a military outpost to protect the nearby silver mines from indigenous raids, and its historic center is a testament to its colonial past.

Today, visitors come to Candela to hike in the nearby mountains, explore the town’s charming cobblestone streets, and relax in the peaceful Plaza Principal. The town is also home to several historic churches, including the beautiful Parroquia de Santiago Apostol, which dates back to the 18th century.

Candela travel tips:

  • Take a scenic drive through the nearby Canon de la Carbonera, a stunning canyon with towering cliffs and lush vegetation
  • Visit the Museo de la Historia de Candela to learn about the town’s colonial history and indigenous roots
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like discada (a meat and vegetable stew cooked in a plow disk) and machacado con huevo (dried beef with scrambled eggs)

Jala, Nayarit

Located in the foothills of the Sierra Madre Occidental mountains in Nayarit, Jala is a charming town that’s known for its beautiful colonial architecture and nearby vulcanology site. The town was founded in the 16th century and quickly became an important agricultural center, known for its production of corn, beans, and other crops.

Today, visitors come to Jala to explore the town’s colorful streets, visit the beautiful Parroquia de Santiago Apostol church, and hike to the nearby Ceboruco volcano. The town is also known for its traditional Voladores ceremony, in which brave young men climb to the top of a tall pole and launch themselves into the air, suspended by ropes tied to their ankles.

Jala travel tips:

  • Take a guided hike to the nearby Ceboruco volcano, one of the most active volcanoes in Mexico
  • Visit the Museo Comunitario de Jala to learn about the town’s history and culture
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like pescado zarandeado (grilled fish) and chilaquiles (a breakfast dish made with fried tortillas, salsa, and cheese)

Cuatro Ciénegas, Coahuila

Located in the Chihuahuan Desert of Coahuila, Cuatro Ciénegas is a small town that’s known for its stunning natural beauty and unique ecosystems. The town is surrounded by a series of natural springs and pools that are home to a wide variety of endemic plant and animal species, many of which are found nowhere else on earth.

Visitors come to Cuatro Ciénegas to explore the town’s charming streets, relax in the natural pools, and hike in the nearby mountains. The town is also home to several interesting museums, including the Museo de las Momias (Museum of the Mummies), which features a collection of naturally mummified remains that were discovered in the area in the early 20th century.

Cuatro Ciénegas travel tips:

  • Take a dip in the crystal-clear waters of the Poza Azul, a stunning natural pool that’s home to several endemic fish species
  • Visit the Área de Protección de Flora y Fauna Cuatrociénegas to learn about the area’s unique ecosystems and biodiversity
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like cabrito (roasted goat) and pan de pulque (a sweet bread made with fermented agave sap)

Salvatierra, Guanajuato

Located in the southern part of Guanajuato, Salvatierra is a charming colonial town that’s known for its beautiful architecture and rich history. The town was founded in the 16th century and quickly became an important agricultural center, known for its production of corn, wheat, and other crops.

Today, visitors come to Salvatierra to explore the town’s colorful streets, visit the beautiful Parroquia de la Virgen de la Luz church, and relax in the peaceful Plaza de Armas. The town is also home to several interesting museums, including the Museo de la Ciudad de Salvatierra, which features exhibits on the town’s history and culture.

Salvatierra travel tips:

  • Take a stroll through the Jardín Hidalgo, a beautiful park that’s home to several species of exotic birds
  • Visit the Templo de San Francisco, a stunning 18th-century church with an ornate Baroque facade
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like pacholas (a type of meatball made with ground beef and spices) and tamales de elote (corn tamales)

Jerez de García Salinas, Zacatecas

Located in the central part of Zacatecas, Jerez de García Salinas is a charming town that’s known for its beautiful colonial architecture and rich cultural heritage. The town was founded in the 16th century and quickly became an important center of agriculture and commerce, known for its production of corn, beans, and other crops.

Today, visitors come to Jerez to explore the town’s colorful streets, visit the beautiful Parroquia de la Inmaculada Concepción church, and relax in the peaceful Plaza de Armas. The town is also home to several interesting museums, including the Museo de la Charrería, which features exhibits on the traditional Mexican sport of charreada (a type of rodeo).

Jerez de García Salinas travel tips:

  • Take a stroll through the Jardín Juárez, a beautiful park that’s home to a stunning bandstand and several species of exotic plants
  • Visit the Ex-Convento de San Francisco, a 16th-century former monastery that’s now home to a museum and cultural center
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like asado de boda (a spicy pork stew) and enchiladas jerezanas (a type of enchilada made with a special red sauce)

Atlixco, Puebla

Atlixco is a colorful town located in the heart of Puebla, known for its stunning colonial architecture, vibrant gardens, and delicious cuisine. Founded in the 16th century, Atlixco has a rich history that’s evident in its well-preserved buildings and charming cobblestone streets.

One of the must-see attractions in Atlixco is the Ex-Convento de San Francisco, a stunning 16th-century monastery that now serves as a cultural center and museum. Visitors can explore the beautiful baroque church, peaceful courtyards, and fascinating exhibits on the town’s history and traditions.

Another highlight of Atlixco is its abundance of flowers, which bloom year-round thanks to the town’s mild climate and fertile soil. In fact, Atlixco is often called the “City of Flowers” and hosts an annual flower festival in the spring that attracts visitors from all over Mexico.

Atlixco travel tips:

  • Visit the Jardín Etnobotánico de Atlixco, a beautiful botanical garden that showcases the region’s native plants and flowers
  • Take a stroll through the Mercado Benito Juárez, a lively market where you can sample traditional Pueblan dishes like mole poblano and chiles en nogada
  • Explore the Cerro de San Miguel, a nearby hill that offers stunning views of the town and surrounding mountains

Real de Asientos, Aguascalientes

Real de Asientos is a charming mining town located in the state of Aguascalientes, known for its beautiful colonial architecture, rich history, and stunning natural surroundings. Founded in the 16th century, Real de Asientos was once a thriving center of silver mining, and its well-preserved buildings and historic mines are a testament to its prosperous past.

One of the top attractions in Real de Asientos is the Mina del Edén, a historic silver mine that’s been converted into a fascinating museum. Visitors can explore the mine’s tunnels and chambers, learn about the town’s mining history, and even try their hand at panning for silver.

Another highlight of Real de Asientos is its stunning natural beauty, with the town surrounded by rugged mountains, deep canyons, and lush forests. Visitors can hike to nearby waterfalls, go horseback riding through the countryside, or simply relax in the town’s peaceful plazas and gardens.

Real de Asientos travel tips:

  • Take a tour of the Mina del Edén to learn about the town’s mining history and try your hand at panning for silver
  • Visit the Parroquia de Nuestra Señora de Belén, a beautiful 18th-century church with an ornate baroque facade
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like birria (a spicy meat stew) and gorditas de maíz (a type of thick corn tortilla stuffed with various fillings)

Compostela, Nayarit

Compostela is a delightful colonial town located in the lush mountains of Nayarit, known for its rich history, beautiful architecture, and stunning natural surroundings. Founded in the 16th century, Compostela was once the capital of the Spanish province of Nueva Galicia, and its well-preserved buildings and charming cobblestone streets are a testament to its important past.

One of the top attractions in Compostela is the Ex-Convento de San Francisco, a stunning 16th-century monastery that now serves as a museum and cultural center. Visitors can explore the beautiful baroque church, peaceful courtyards, and fascinating exhibits on the town’s history and traditions.

Another highlight of Compostela is its stunning natural beauty, with the town surrounded by lush tropical forests, cascading waterfalls, and crystal-clear rivers. Visitors can hike to nearby natural wonders like the Salto de Malpaso waterfall, go birdwatching in the surrounding forests, or simply relax in the town’s peaceful plazas and gardens.

Compostela travel tips:

  • Take a stroll through the Jardín Hidalgo, a beautiful park that’s home to a stunning bandstand and several species of exotic plants
  • Visit the Museo Comunitario de Compostela to learn about the town’s rich history and cultural traditions
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like pescado zarandeado (a type of grilled fish) and tostadas de ceviche (a type of seafood salad served on a crispy tortilla)

Amealco de Bonfil, Querétaro

Amealco de Bonfil is a charming town located in the mountainous region of Querétaro, known for its rich indigenous culture, stunning natural beauty, and delicious cuisine. The town is home to a large population of Otomí people, one of Mexico’s oldest indigenous groups, and their colorful textiles, intricate embroidery, and unique language are an integral part of Amealco’s identity.

One of the top attractions in Amealco is the Mercado de Artesanías, a vibrant market where visitors can browse and purchase traditional Otomí crafts like textiles, pottery, and baskets. The market is also a great place to sample regional specialties like barbacoa (slow-cooked lamb), quesadillas de huitlacoche (a type of corn fungus), and pulque (a fermented agave drink

Another highlight of Amealco is its stunning natural surroundings, with the town nestled in a lush valley surrounded by rolling hills and picturesque farmland. Visitors can hike to nearby waterfalls, go horseback riding through the countryside, or simply relax in the town’s peaceful plazas and gardens.

Amealco de Bonfil travel tips:

  • Visit the Centro de las Artes de Querétaro to learn about the town’s rich cultural heritage and see traditional Otomí crafts being made
  • Take a stroll through the Jardín Principal, a beautiful park that’s home to a stunning church and several species of exotic plants
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like nopales con chorizo (cactus with spicy sausage) and tamales de acelgas (a type of tamale made with chard)

Tlaxco, Tlaxcala

Tlaxco is a picturesque town located in the mountainous region of Tlaxcala, known for its stunning natural beauty, rich history, and unique cultural traditions. The town is surrounded by lush forests, rolling hills, and crystal-clear streams, making it a popular destination for outdoor enthusiasts and nature lovers.

City in Mexico

One of the top attractions in Tlaxco is the Ex-Convento de San Francisco, a stunning 16th-century monastery that now serves as a museum and cultural center. Visitors can explore the beautiful baroque church, peaceful courtyards, and fascinating exhibits on the town’s history and traditions.

Another highlight of Tlaxco is its unique cultural traditions, which blend indigenous and Spanish influences in a fascinating way. The town is known for its colorful festivals and celebrations, including the Feria de Tlaxco, a lively event that features traditional music, dance, and crafts.

Tlaxco travel tips:

  • Take a hike to the nearby Laguna de Atlangatepec, a stunning lake surrounded by lush forests and rolling hills
  • Visit the Museo Comunitario de Tlaxco to learn about the town’s rich history and cultural traditions
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like mole de olla (a type of hearty stew) and tlacoyos (a type of stuffed corn tortilla)

Nuevo Baztán, State of Mexico

Nuevo Baztán is a fascinating town located in the State of Mexico, known for its unique architecture, rich history, and stunning natural surroundings. The town was founded in the 18th century by a Spanish entrepreneur named Juan de Goyeneche, who sought to create a self-sufficient industrial community based on the principles of the Enlightenment.

One of the top attractions in Nuevo Baztán is the Palacio de Goyeneche, a stunning baroque palace that now serves as a museum and cultural center. Visitors can explore the beautiful halls and chambers of the palace, learn about the town’s unique history and architecture, and see fascinating exhibits on the life and work of Juan de Goyeneche.

Another highlight of Nuevo Baztán is its stunning natural surroundings, with the town nestled in a lush valley surrounded by rolling hills and picturesque farmland. Visitors can hike to nearby waterfalls, go horseback riding through the countryside, or simply relax in the town’s peaceful plazas and gardens.

Nuevo Baztán travel tips:

  • Take a guided tour of the Palacio de Goyeneche to learn about the town’s unique history and architecture
  • Visit the Iglesia de San Francisco Javier, a stunning baroque church that’s considered one of the finest examples of its kind in Mexico
  • Sample traditional regional dishes like cochinita pibil (slow-roasted pork) and sopa azteca (a type of tortilla soup)

mexico Travel guide & articles

Here are my top travel resources and helpful travel articles & tips to help you get started with traveling.

Mexico Travel Resources

FAQ

What is a Pueblo Magico?

Pueblos Magicos, or Magical Towns, is a program developed by Mexico’s Secretariat of Tourism to recognize towns that offer a unique and “magical” experience to visitors. The designation is based on a town’s natural beauty, cultural riches, historical relevance, traditions, gastronomy, art & crafts, and warm hospitality.

How many Pueblos Magicos are there in Mexico?

As of 2023, there are 177 officially designated Pueblos Magicos located across Mexico’s 32 states. The program originally launched with just 30 localities in 2001, and new pueblos are added to the list every few years.

What are the most visited Pueblos Magicos in Mexico?

Some of the most popular Pueblos Magicos that draw significant numbers of tourists include:

  • Tequila, Jalisco
  • San Miguel de Allende, Guanajuato
  • Taxco, Guerrero
  • San Cristobal de las Casas, Chiapas
  • Tepoztlan, Morelos
  • Valladolid, Yucatan
  • Todos Santos, Baja California Sur

What are some off-the-beaten-path Pueblos Magicos?

If you want to avoid the crowds and experience a Pueblo Magico that’s a bit more under the radar, consider:

  • Bacalar, Quintana Roo
  • Real de Catorce, San Luis Potosí
  • Cuetzalan, Puebla
  • Comala, Colima
  • Creel, Chihuahua
  • El Fuerte, Sinaloa
  • Mascota, Jalisco
  • Pátzcuaro, Michoacán

What are some Pueblos Magicos near Mexico City?

There are several wonderful Pueblos Magicos located within easy day trip or weekend getaway distance of Mexico City:

As you can see, Mexico’s Pueblos Mágicos offer a wealth of fascinating history, stunning natural beauty, and rich cultural traditions to explore. Whether you’re interested in colonial architecture, indigenous crafts, delicious cuisine, or outdoor adventures, there’s sure to be a magical town that captures your heart and imagination. So why not plan a trip to one of these enchanting destinations and discover the magic of Mexico for yourself?

Save To Read Later:

Similar Posts